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Tekken Tag Tournament 2

Tekken Tag Tournament 2

Tekken Tag Tournament 2

Tekken Tag Tournament 2 is the eighth main installment in the Tekken fighting game series, originally released in Japanese arcades on September 14, 2011. It received an update, subtitled Unlimited, on March 27, 2012. A console version based on the update was released for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 in September 2012, accompanied by an extensive promotional campaign. It was also ported to the Wii U as one of the system's launch titles in November 2012, subtitled Wii U Edition.

Like the original Tekken Tag Tournament , the game includes almost every character from past Tekken games, giving it the largest playable roster in a Tekken game to date. Players can choose either a team of two characters on each side or a solo character. Tekken Tag Tournament 2 has been positively received by critics, earning averaged review scores in the range of 82-83% at both GameRankings and Metacritic for the PlayStation 3, Wii U and Xbox 360 versions, as well as several fighting game of the year awards.

Tekken Tag Tournament 2 Plot

Unlike the original Tekken Tag Tournament, the game's sequel features a storyline although it is still not the series canon. Just like last time, it is more of a "dream match", giving fans the opportunity to play as almost every character in the series up to that point, including some of those that had apparently been missing in the main Tekken storyline, in addition to the character roster of Tekken 6. In the story, Heihachi Mishima has developed a rejuvenation serum, which, as it name suggests, has the ability to regress his appearance and power. After consuming it, Heihachi hosts another King of Iron Fist Tournament, sensing powerful challengers who would come to the tournament.

In "Fight Lab" section of the game, Lee Chaolan, under the guise of Violet is working on a new version of Combot. As soon as Combot is complete, Violet begins its simulation test. After the simulation test, the Combot explodes and destroys the lab. Violet decides to use the other functioning Combot to complete the tests. After Combot completes five tests, Violet kidnaps Jin, Kazuya and Heihachi for Combot's final test. Combot apparently has the upper hand, but Jin transforms into his Devil form and destroys it. Violet blows up the Combot, presumably taking the Mishima bloodline with it, and says, "Excellent!".

Tekken Tag Tournament 2 Gameplay

As in the original Tekken Tag Tournament, matches involve each player selecting two fighters to fight with. Players are able to switch their fighters out at any time, allowing the inactive character to gradually recover some life they might have lost. At certain points, an inactive character's life bar may flash, giving them a temporary boost in strength if they are tagged in. If the life bar of either of a player's fighters runs out, that player loses the round. If time runs out, the player who has the most cumulative life remaining amongst their fighters wins the round.

The gameplay expands on the tag mechanics featured in the first Tekken Tag, allowing for extended tag combos and combined moves. New techniques include combined tag throws which, if timed properly, can be escaped from. Tag combos (referred to as "Tag Assaults") can now be done simultaneously with both characters participating in the combo at the same time. The game inherits gameplay features from Tekken 6, such as "Bound" hits (hits that slam an airborne opponent to the ground and stun them so combos can be extended) and walled arenas. Character customization is also featured, similar to past Tekken games.

Features suggested by Katsuhiro Harada include recording in Practice mode as well as a Tutorial to bring new players into the fold more smoothly than has been possible in the past. The game features a "stage gimmick" system. An example of the system shown in Famitsu has the player slamming his opponent into wall, which breaks and the opponent goes flying, landing in a new area where the fight continues. As the opponent falls, the tag partner is waiting at the bottom to continue the combo.

The game features various modes, allowing players to choose between Tag Team (2 vs 2), Single (1 vs 1), or Handicap Matches ( 2 vs 1 or 1 vs 2), options for four players to play in a single match, and various online modes. Along with returning modes such as Arcade, Versus, Team Battle, Time Attack and Survival, a new mode called Fight Lab allows players to train a Combot through various challenges. The game also features various items that can alter the gameplay, ranging from weapons such as firearms and hammer hats to superficial items such as specialized KOs, and allows players to customize their fighters with various accessories.

The Wii U Edition includes the return of the mini-game Tekken Ball from Tekken 3 and an exclusive Mushroom Battle mode in which various mushrooms from the Mario series litter the arena, causing players to grow or shrink in size or take extra damage. It also features optional touch-based controls using the system's gamepad, as well as exclusive costumes based on Nintendo media franchise.

Reception
Tekken Tag Tournament 2 has been met with an overall positive critical response, with aggregating review websites GameRankings and Metacritic assigning the Wii U version 83.15% and 83/100, Xbox 360 version 82.93% and 83/100 and PlayStation 3 version 82.49% and 82/100. During its first month of sale, it shifted 840,000 copies in Europe and Japan. As of January 2013, 1.35 million copies have been sold worldwide.

In Famitsu, the game scored a near-perfect rating of 39/40 for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 versions, which was the magazine's highest score for a traditional fighting game since Dead or Alive 4 in 2005. Joystiq applauded the game for including everything that makes Tekken good, stating "its surprisingly deep, accessible gameplay mechanics to its bombastic and hilarious attitude all presented in a package more polished and refined than ever before." GameSpot hailed this "well-executed and punishing fighter" for its combat system, online play, the Fight Lab mode, and customizable soundtrack, but criticized the inadequate tutorial modes. According to Eurogamer, "It plays it a little safe in places and lacks a truly killer single-player mode, but by broadening the versatility of the tag system while dramatically improving the online functionality, Namco has crafted a new teamwork seminar that builds upon the original in almost all the areas that matter." IGN was more critical of the game that while approving the core gameplay and content, felt that the similar gameplay of its predecessors made it difficult for newcomers of the series. Game Informer noted that the game does not overhaul the franchise, but retains the series' already solid gameplay, adding: "It offers a ton of fighters, the tag system is interesting, it plays well online, and it preserves the goofy sense of humor that defines the series. Even with a somewhat bare-bones online offering, its still one of the most refined fighters on the market." GameTrailers wrote: "Spinoff or not, this is the best Tekken game in years."


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