Wonder Club world wonders pyramid logo WonderClub Facebook WonderClub Tweet   WonderClub RSS feed Join WonderClub's Twitter Page Join WonderClub's Facebook Page
World Wonders
Wildlife
Celebrities
Movies
Puzzles
Comics
Video Games

When Our Eyes No Longer See: Realism, Science, and Ecology in Japanese Literary Modernism written by Gregory Golley

 

When Our Eyes No Longer See: Realism, Science, and Ecology in Japanese Literary Modernism written by Gregory Golley

Overview:

As industrial and scientific developments in early-twentieth-century Japan transformed the meaning of “objective observation,” modern writers and poets struggled to capture what they had come to see as an evolving network of invisible relations joining people to the larger material universe. For these artists, literary modernism was a crisis of perception before it was a crisis of representation. When Our Eyes No Longer See portrays an extraordinary moment in the history of this perceptual crisis and in Japanese literature during the 1920s and 1930s.

The displacement in science of “positivist” notions of observation by a “realist” model of knowledge provided endless inspiration for Japanese writers. Gregory Golley turns a critical eye to the ideological and ecological incarnations of scientific realism in several modernist works: the photographic obsessions of Tanizaki Jun’ichiro’s Naomi, the disjunctive portraits of the imperial economy in Yokomitsu Riichi’s Shanghai, the tender depictions of astrophysical phenomena and human-wildlife relations in the children’s stories of Miyazawa Kenji.

Attending closely to the political and ethical consequences of this realist turn, this study focuses on the common struggle of science and art to reclaim the invisible as an object of representation and belief.

Synopsis:

As industrial and scientific developments in early-twentieth-century Japan transformed the meaning of “objective observation,” modern writers and poets struggled to capture what they had come to see as an evolving network of invisible relations joining people to the larger material universe. For these artists, literary modernism was a crisis of perception before it was a crisis of representation. When Our Eyes No Longer See portrays an extraordinary moment in the history of this perceptual crisis and in Japanese literature during the 1920s and 1930s.

The displacement in science of “positivist” notions of observation by a “realist” model of knowledge provided endless inspiration for Japanese writers. Gregory Golley turns a critical eye to the ideological and ecological incarnations of scientific realism in several modernist works: the photographic obsessions of Tanizaki Jun’ichiro’s Naomi, the disjunctive portraits of the imperial economy in Yokomitsu Riichi’s Shanghai, the tender depictions of astrophysical phenomena and human-wildlife relations in the children’s stories of Miyazawa Kenji.

Attending closely to the political and ethical consequences of this realist turn, this study focuses on the common struggle of science and art to reclaim the invisible as an object of representation and belief.

Journal of Asian Studies

Golley's book is eloquent and erudite, offering subtle critiques of our understanding of the literary history of Japan in the 1920s and 1930s through both a fine-grained historical account of the discourses of the "new scientific realism" in prewar Japan and through a series of rereadings of some of the major figures of the interwar period.

— Jonathan Zwicker

Book Buying Options

Buy Digital Book
Only $36.25

Buy Audio Book
Only $72.5


Title: When Our Eyes No Longer See: Realism, Science, and Ecology in Japanese Literary Modernism

Have one to sell, click here?

 


Complaints | Coins | Blog | Kites | Digital Media | Magazines | Soul | Dating | Obituary | Outdoor Living | Homeopathy | Contact Us | Golf | Books | Makeup | Chat | FAQ


CAN'T FIND WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR? CLICK HERE!!!