Wonder Club world wonders pyramid logo WonderClub Facebook WonderClub Tweet   WonderClub RSS feed Join WonderClub's Twitter Page Join WonderClub's Facebook Page
World Wonders
Wildlife
Celebrities
Movies
Puzzles
Comics
Video Games

Alternative Alices written by Carolyn Sigler

 

Alternative Alices written by Carolyn Sigler

Overview:

Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871) are among the most enduring works in the English language. In the decades following their publication, writers on both sides of the Atlantic produced no fewer than two hundred imitations, revisions, and parodies of Carroll's fantasies for children. Carolyn Sigler has gathered the most interesting and original of these responses to the Alice books, many of them long out of print. Produced between 1869 and 1930, these works trace the extraordinarily creative, and often critical, response of diverse writers. These writers -- male and female, radical and conservative -- appropriated Carroll's structures, motifs, and themes in their Alice-inspired works in order to engage in larger cultural debates. Their stories range from Christina Rossetti's angry subversion of Alice's adventures, Speaking Likenesses (1874), to G.E. Farrow's witty fantasy adventure, The Wallypug of Why (1895), to Edward Hope's hilarious parody of social and political foibles, Alice in the Delighted States (1928). Anyone who has ever followed Alice down the rabbit hole will enjoy the adventures of her literary siblings in the wide Wonderland of the human imagination.

Synopsis:

"Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871) are among the most enduring works in the English language. In the decades following their publication, writers on both sides of the Atlantic produced no fewer than two hundred imitations, revisions, and parodies of Carroll's fantasies for children. Carolyn Sigler has gathered the most interesting and original of these responses to the Alice books, many of them long out of print. Produced between 1869 and 1930, these works trace the extraordinarily creative, and often critical, response of diverse writers. These writers — male and female, radical and conservative — appropriated Carroll's structures, motifs, and themes in their Alice-inspired works in order to engage in larger cultural debates. Their stories range from Christina Rossetti's angry subversion of Alice's adventures, Speaking Likenesses (1874), to G.E. Farrow's witty fantasy adventure, The Wallypug of Why (1895), to Edward Hope's hilarious parody of social and political foibles, Alice in the Delighted States (1928). Anyone who has ever followed Alice down the rabbit hole will enjoy the adventures of her literary siblings in the wide Wonderland of the human imagination.

Publishers Weekly

"Off with her head!" The queen would have been furious at this chaotic tea party of an anthology, hosted by an editor who seems to think more of Lewis Carroll's admirers and disciples than of the honoree. To any grownup reader unfamiliar with Carroll's Alice books, Sigler would give the impression that the more socially enlightened and politically correct spin-offs of the late 19th and early 20th centuries were superior to the original. "Unlike the anxiously polite Alice who, like a good Victorian child, attempts to please and placate adults," she comments, Juliana Horatia Ewing's Amelia (of "Amelia and the Dwarfs") "is powerful and aggressive." In fact she's just plain bad; what makes Ewing's naughty character worth renewed attention is that she's funny. "`You seem to think things clean and mend themselves, Miss Amelia,' said poor nurse one day. `No, I don't,' said Amelia, rudely. `I think you do them; what are you here for?'" Amelia isn't the collection's only engaging alter-Alice. Among the 20 selections, written between 1869 and 1930 (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland came out in 1865), Sigler finds several gems: delightful homages, determined imitations and devotional sequels to Carroll's works by E. Nesbit, Tom Hood, Anna M. Richards, E.F. Benson and Charles E. Carryl, among others. Unfortunately, Sigler doesn't always distinguish excerpts from full works; even when one reads a piece that seems complete, one still wonders. Illustrations. (Sept.)

Book Buying Options

Buy Digital Book
Only $30.00

Buy Audio Book
Only $60


Title: Alternative Alices

Have one to sell, click here?

 


Complaints | Coins | Blog | Kites | Digital Media | Magazines | Soul | Dating | Obituary | Outdoor Living | Golf | Homeopathy | Contact Us | Books | Makeup | Chat | FAQ


CAN'T FIND WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR? CLICK HERE!!!